Occom Discovery Center

“Discover the God who is and your place in his  kingdom”

Occom Discovery Center is a discipleship center for Native American and First Nations Christians to grow in the grace and knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ. The approach is different than traditional Bible colleges or ministry training centers. ODC is not a diploma/degree-granting institution. Learning, developing, and growing are essential for discipleship, letter grades are not.

220px-Rev_Samson_Occom

Occom Discovery Center is named in honor of Rev. Samson Occom (Mohegan, 1723-1792). Rev. Occom was the first Native American ordained Presbyterian minister. One of his driving desires was to give the gospel to Native people and provide them with education that would enable them to live in and thrive in their rapidly changing world. He taught at the Moor’s Charity School for Native Americans in Lebonon, CT. Later the school was moved to New Hampshire and became Dartmouth College, which did — for a short time — provide higher education to Native people, only without Samson Occom. Although there are some very sad elements and disappointments in Occom’s story, we find great inspiration in his commitment to the kingdom and Native people.

Discovering the God Who Is . . .

As the name implies, ODC aims towards discovery. Above all, we seek to discover the glories of the Triune God who is as he has revealed himself in the Holy Scriptures. In light of that revelation, we seek to discover our place in his kingdom. God has gifted each and every believer. ODC seeks to help Native American/First Nations disciples of Christ discover their gifts and foster a vision to engage them in the kingdom. In this regard, ODC is a place to begin and/or continue to discover their calling in this world.

The means by which we seek to achieve those ends are multifaceted. Regarding our pursuit of God, we are firmly committed to the ordinary means of grace revealed in Scripture, e.g. reading Scripture, preaching, teaching, prayer, singing, and sacraments. Students will attend a healthy, Christ-centered church.

. . . and Your Place in His Kingdom

Life at ODC may seem monastic in style. That is, disciples are expected to work, follow daily routines, and participate in community life on the campus, as well as seek times of solitude for biblical meditation. The key difference between the historic monastic movement (or at least caricatures of it) and ODC is that we seek to prepare students to go and engage in the world around them. By virtue of that, ODC seeks to be merely a momentary — but life-changing — chapter in the student’s unfolding story.

A bedrock conviction at ODC is that we as creatures created in the image of our Creator were created to create. ODC is a community that dares God’s people to dream. We are seeking those who are visionaries, makers, thinkers, tinkerers doers, happen-makers, craftsmen, artists, builders, and anyone else who wants to dare to dream. All those who are timid, hurt, scared, curious, and most of all, willing to be shaped by the hands of the Potter, are encouraged to join us.

ODC seeks to cultivate a Christian worldview that is both taught and caught, recognizing that changed lives are more influenced by the latter in community. Using multiple methods, ODC seeks to foster twenty-four key areas (displayed below in complementary pairs) in which disciples of Christ are encouraged to continue and cultivate long after their time at ODC.

Occom Discovery Center is a place to discover:

  1. Common Grace/Redeeming Grace
  2. Work/Sabbath
  3. Word/Deed
  4. Community/Solitude
  5. Unity/Diversity
  6. Spiritual Gifts/Natural Talents
  7. Risk/Safety
  8. Giving/Receiving
  9. Listening/Expressing
  10. Personal Identity/Corporate Identity
  11. Increasing/Decreasing
  12. The God who is and your place in his Kingdom

Sounds Great! So where is it?

Right now ODC is still only a dream, but it has been dream that began many years ago. There is no campus, no students, and no staff yet, but the need is an ever-present reality. After serving with various churches and educational ministries, serving in various capacities in multiple locations in Native America for the last thirteen years, we believe that the Lord has prepared us for this very thing. We have presented our proposal to our overseers and peers and received a green light to move forward. This is our long-haul ministry focus.

We are in the dreaming-out-loud phase — trying to find others who can catch the vision and dream with us. Right now we are praying for a location. We have some essential criteria along with a list of preferences. We need land. The Lord owns the cattle on a thousand hills — and he owns the hills too! So we are asking the Lord to move upon someone with property to offer for use in the kingdom. Are you that someone, or do you know someone? Has the Lord blessed you with the means to purchase the property? We would love to talk with you. We have our vision document available upon request.

Take some action steps right now:

  • Pray to the Lord of the Harvest that He will bring this dream into reality.
  • Forward this post to someone you know who may be interested in hearing more about the Occom Discovery Center.
  • Tell your pastors or missions committee about ODC. Invite us to your church whether in person or via Skype or ZOOM or phone interview.

Never underestimate your influence and effect in the kingdom. Give us a call.

All for the Kingdom!

Patrick and Regina Lennox

MTW Missionaries to Native America

Who Should Support the Great Commission?

I don’t believe missionaries should have to raise their own support. It is an unnecessary burden for them. The church should be sending missionaries, therefore I will not support you.

This was essentially the answer I received from someone who was invited to partner with us. I was saddened for a number of reasons, but the one that troubles me the most was the reasoning he gave. And not so much that it was his reason, but it was once mine, too. He was firm in his conviction and for me to insist on a longer discussion on the matter would have been pushy and argumentative. But I have been challenged to think about the matter more and hopefully the following will be helpful to others.

Hi, I am a missionary. Please give me money…

Yes, there are times when I would rather just not go through all this traveling, and calling, and texting, and calling, and emailing, and calling, and writing, and calling, and asking. But, believe it or not, Continue reading

Posts, Tweets, Confessions, Disclaimers, Etc.

Image found @CEO on Twitter

Image found @CEO on Twitter

From time to time you will notice that I post a variety of things on social media concerning Native America in general and Cherokee specifically. It may be historical or current, political or religious, historic or simply culturally interesting. I post, tweet, re-tweet, and pass stuff along as I notice them from my Native American media feeds. I do this that you (we) may gain a better perspective of how Native Americans view the world. Since most of us have had our ideas about Native Americans shaped by Hollywood movies and U.S. government history books, it would only be wise to allow them to speak for themselves.

James 1:9 tells us that we should be quick to hear and slow to speak. Although I have studied a bit and have some knowledge of Native Americans, I don’t feel entitled to any real opinion that matters, except that the name of Jesus was too often misrepresented among them and only He can provide true reconciliation. By passing something along to you, I am not asking you to agree with all that is represented, but I would hope that you would try to understand why an individual or tribe may feel as strongly as they do about things.

Cultural sensitivity is not the same as political correctness. As Christians we need to be kingdom focused. We should do everything we can that doesn’t violate Scripture to break down every barrier and remove every stumbling block that hinders us from clearly proclaiming the gospel to Native Americans. The Apostle Paul became all things to all men that he might save some (1 Cor 9:19), but too often Christians are not willing to do that. We hold so firmly to our denominational and political allegiances (dare I say racial/ethnic  and socioeconomic as well), that we have no idea what it means to follow Paul’s example. I am not exempt from this charge. I hope you will join me in getting acquainted with our Native American neighbors and hopefully get reacquainted with the Lord of the Harvest whom we represent.

Please visit our Contact page to see the various ways you can track with us. You also may want to check out John Piper’s sermon on 1 Cor 9:19 by clicking here.