Dear #TGC17 Friend,

Dear TGC friend,

We are Patrick and Regina Lennox – MTW missionaries to the Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island. We want to affirm our love for the church and our commitment to the gospel and the Great Commission. We are Reformed in theology and Presbyterian (PCA) in polity. Our missional burden is for the 1,200 federally recognized Native nations in the US and Canada. Of particular importance to us is how we apply our theology to cultural engagement. We trust that this is a priority for you as well.

As we spend the next few days taking in a lot of good lectures and discussions, I want to challenge you to consider how we can apply what we are learning to our Native neighbors. In order for us to be good witnesses for Christ, we must be good neighbors. We are available to talk with you about how we can be better neighbors to our nation’s first mission field.

Martin Luther

Martin Luther. Credit: Adobe Stock

This year as we celebrate 500 years of the Protestant Reformation, our burden is to awaken the church to a mission field that has become invisible to the average American Christian. Unfortunately in order to do that, we must deal with some unpleasant truths that have been largely ignored for generations. How can I say this politely? If your knowledge of Native America is mostly from high school text books, Hollywood, and/or news media headlines, then you have no real knowledge of your 5.2 million Native neighbors in the US and Canada or their history.

Read HOW: Where you informed about Native Americans? here.

I do believe there is much to celebrate when it comes to gospel proclamation among Native Americans. Yet there is so much more to lament when we understand what was done in the name of God and country that has caused irreparable and ongoing damage to Native people for nearly a half millennium.

We are calling the church to reflect, lament, repent, reform, and go to Native America again with boldness in the gospel and with humility and meekness in spirit. We cannot do that if we don’t first take a look at our history from a Native perspective.

Click here to see a sampling of resources from a Native perspective, Native America Today.

Many of the discussions here at TGC concern racial reconciliation, justice, cultural engagement, or the “re-shaping” of culture. Please understand, Native Americans have nearly had their culture completely wiped out by the dominant society that proclaimed itself Christian – and yes, the church was actually directly involved in that process.

This is by no means a critique on the legitimacy of our efforts to culturally engage the world around us. This is simply a reminder that if we ignore our failures as a church in history, then we are destined to repeat them. Jesus deserves better than that. We can do better than that. The best days are ahead of us if we learn from our errors that turned the Great Commission into the Great Imposition. The question is, are we willing to recognize those errors, own them as part of our history, and then seek to re-engage a mis-reached and forgotten mission field for the Lord of Glory?

If your answer is yes to that question, we would like to talk with you. We are striving to reach our mission field by summer 2017. We would like you to be part of our team as we make disciples in Native America. We will be at TGC on Tuesday and Wednesday. If you would like to Skype or ZOOM, call, email, or text, we are available for that.  You can message us on the TGC2017 app or text us. Better yet, come by the MTW booth. We’d love to talk with you.

Patrick & Regina Lennox

Missionaries to Native America/Mokahum Ministry Center/Bemidji, MN

 

 

HOW: Were you informed about Native Americans?

HOW: Were you informed about Native Americans?

How many of us have ever gone through the age-old ritual of that standard, cliché, Indian greeting? You know the one where you put on your best blank stare, raise your right hand as if to take an oath in court, and with monotone voice, you say, “HOW.” In case you didn’t know, it’s not a real greeting, and it’s not real funny. But it is a real sign that you may be misinformed about a real people group living among us.

As non-Indian American Christians, let’s turn that around and get informed. Perhaps we can convert an uncouth greeting into a prompt for a series of questions that will better align us with Christ’s purposes:

  • How can we better love our unbelieving Native neighbors?
  • How can we be better witnesses to the resurrection power of Jesus Christ to Native Americans?
  • How can we avoid age-old, man-made stumbling blocks that get in the way of the Great Commission?
  • How can we be better brothers and sisters to the Native American church?
  • How can we change our assumptions, ignorance, and unchallenged ideas about Native Americans?
  • How can we reach out to Native Americans as emissaries of peace for the kingdom of Christ rather than repelling them as just another misinformed generation of non-Native Americans?
  • How can we better pray for Native America?

. . . and the list could go on.

Excerpt from HOW: Were you informed about Native America? To read more, click here

Posts, Tweets, Confessions, Disclaimers, Etc.

Image found @CEO on Twitter

Image found @CEO on Twitter

From time to time you will notice that I post a variety of things on social media concerning Native America in general and Cherokee specifically. It may be historical or current, political or religious, historic or simply culturally interesting. I post, tweet, re-tweet, and pass stuff along as I notice them from my Native American media feeds. I do this that you (we) may gain a better perspective of how Native Americans view the world. Since most of us have had our ideas about Native Americans shaped by Hollywood movies and U.S. government history books, it would only be wise to allow them to speak for themselves.

James 1:9 tells us that we should be quick to hear and slow to speak. Although I have studied a bit and have some knowledge of Native Americans, I don’t feel entitled to any real opinion that matters, except that the name of Jesus was too often misrepresented among them and only He can provide true reconciliation. By passing something along to you, I am not asking you to agree with all that is represented, but I would hope that you would try to understand why an individual or tribe may feel as strongly as they do about things.

Cultural sensitivity is not the same as political correctness. As Christians we need to be kingdom focused. We should do everything we can that doesn’t violate Scripture to break down every barrier and remove every stumbling block that hinders us from clearly proclaiming the gospel to Native Americans. The Apostle Paul became all things to all men that he might save some (1 Cor 9:19), but too often Christians are not willing to do that. We hold so firmly to our denominational and political allegiances (dare I say racial/ethnic  and socioeconomic as well), that we have no idea what it means to follow Paul’s example. I am not exempt from this charge. I hope you will join me in getting acquainted with our Native American neighbors and hopefully get reacquainted with the Lord of the Harvest whom we represent.

Please visit our Contact page to see the various ways you can track with us. You also may want to check out John Piper’s sermon on 1 Cor 9:19 by clicking here.